The Bioengineering Interdisciplinary Training in Diabetes Research Program (BTDR) is a cross-disciplinary doctoral program is designed to develop the next generation interdisciplinary workforce that innovates, designs, and translates bioengineering technologies aimed at preventing and treating diabetes, metabolic diseases, and their complications. The program lies at the interface of the Weldon School, College of Veterinary Medicine, and Indiana University School of Medicine, allowing students to matriculate via BME, IBSC, or MSTP pathways toward PHD BME and MD-PHD BME degrees. This program allows teams of engineers, physical scientists, computational scientists, analytical chemists, pharmacologists, physiologists, and endocrinologists to work seamlessly across traditional boundaries on common goal-oriented projects (bio-artificial pancreas, designer drugs, electroceuticals, integrated care devices). Trainees learn to operate beyond hypothesis-driven research, incorporating principles and practices of engineering design, standardization and validation, regulatory policy, technology translation and entrepreneurship.
The QAA released the first "framework for higher education qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland" in January 2001. This specified learning outcomes for M-level (master's) degrees and advised that the title "Master" should only be used for qualifications that met those learning outcomes in full. It addressed many of the Dearing Report's concerns, specifying that shorter courses at H-level (honours), e.g. conversion courses, should be styled Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate rather than as master's degrees, but confirmed that the extended undergraduate degrees were master's degrees, saying that "Some Masters degrees in science and engineering are awarded after extended undergraduate programmes that last, typically, a year longer than Honours degree programmes". It also addressed the Oxbridge MA issue, noting that "the MAs granted by the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge are not academic qualifications".[43] The first "framework for qualifications of Higher Education Institutes in Scotland", also published in January 2001, used the same qualifications descriptors, adding in credit values that specified that a stand-alone master should be 180 credits and a "Masters (following an integrated programme from undergraduate to Masters level study)" should be 600 credits with a minimum of 120 at M-level. It was specified that the title "Master" should only be used for qualifications that met the learning outcomes and credit definitions, although it was noted that "A small number of universities in Scotland have a long tradition of labelling certain first degrees as 'MA'. Reports of Agency reviews of such provision will relate to undergraduate benchmarks and will make it clear that the title reflects Scottish custom and practice, and that any positive judgement on standards should not be taken as implying that the outcomes of the programme were at postgraduate level."[44]
The master’s degree in elementary education at Emporia State is designed for career changers who are interested in teaching elementary school. With online courses and a clinical experience placement near you, you can earn a master’s degree without changing locations. In as little as two years, you will be eligible for an elementary education teaching license. When you finish your degree, you will enter the teaching profession at the master’s degree level on the pay scale. A background in the education field is not required.
Although systems of higher education date back to ancient Greece, ancient Rome, China, ancient India and Arabian Peninsula, the concept of postgraduate education depends upon the system of awarding degrees at different levels of study, and can be traced to the workings of European medieval universities, mostly Italians.[2][3] University studies took six years for a bachelor's degree and up to twelve additional years for a master's degree or doctorate. The first six years taught the faculty of the arts, which was the study of the seven liberal arts: arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, music theory, grammar, logic, and rhetoric. The main emphasis was on logic. Once a Bachelor of Arts degree had been obtained, the student could choose one of three faculties—law, medicine, or theology—in which to pursue master's or doctor's degrees.
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