Up to 18 hours of Special Topics (EEL 5934, 6935, and 7936) may be applied toward the degree. Up to six hours of unstructured credit hours total (EEL 5905, EEL 6905 or EGN 5949) may be applied toward the degree. Students can count a maximum of 3 credits of EGN 5949 toward their degree program. No other S/U credit can be counted toward the degree. All non‐thesis students are required to have a one‐member supervisory committee. The ECE department chair serves as the default non‐thesis committee member for all non‐thesis students and is automatically appointed for all non‐thesis students during their graduating semester. Students must receive a final grade of “C” or better to receive degree credit for a letter graded course. A course with a final grade of “C” and above cannot be repeated for credit. If a student receives a grade less than a “C” for a course, s/he may retake the course and an average of both grades will be used when compiling GPA graduation requirements. Courses in which students receive a grade of “C‐“ or lower will not be used to fulfill credit requirements but will adversely affect a students’ GPA.
Some graduate programs also have a more significant research component than undergraduate studies. And other graduate schools offer professional degrees which may be more focused on practical skills and knowledge. Examples include the MBA, MPA, PsyD and DNP. The type of grad school you attend, degree you seek and chosen area of study will play a large role in determining your graduate school experience.
Nurse anesthetists treat patients undergoing anesthesia for a surgical procedure or another medical procedure. They interview patients beforehand to determine the best anesthesia, monitor the vital signs of patients during a procedure, and evaluate patients after receiving anesthesia. Nurse anesthetists must hold at least a master's degree, and most work in hospitals, surgical centers, and other clinical settings.
Of course, after earning a master's degree, individuals can pursue careers in their fields of study. But before graduating, it can be worthwhile to join industry- or occupation-specific professional organizations, and to network with professors and other master's degree students — actions that can result in potential employment opportunities. Others may wish to continue their education and enroll in doctoral degree programs. The doctorate route is particularly common for individuals who want to land research-based positions or high positions in academic or non-academic settings.
"This program is designed to give students a thorough training in fundamental computational and applied mathematics and to develop their research ability in a specific application field.  The fields of application include a wide range of areas such as fluid mechanics, materials science, and mathematical biology, and engineering applications such as image processing. Entering students should have a background in mathematics, physics, or engineering.
Be aware that the set of rules and constraints for your degree program are actually a combination of policies defined by the CS Department, the Graduate School, and sometimes other entities such as the Registrar's Office. This site presents these rules and constraints as you must satisfy them, without necessarily explaining who is the ultimate authority for any given one. It is possible that you will seek an exemption to some rule or requirement. This is when it becomes important to find out who "owns" that rule. In general, the Graduate School defines a framework for a degree program, and a Department fleshes this out. For example, the Graduate School requires that all PhD students take a Preliminary Exam and a Final Exam. The Department is free to define the mechanics of these exams, but not their existance, nor the scheduling process. So for example, it is a Graduate School rule that there must be a certain minimum amount of time between a Preliminary Exam and a Final Exam. So only the Graduate School would be able to grant an exemption (if they were so inclined).
Students study interdisciplinary knowledge and problem-solving skills in the rapidly emerging areas of information technology applications. They cover the general theories of information and systems, major techniques of information retrieval and management, and practical skills of communication, problem solving, and project management that information professionals and system analyst should possess.
A Water Resources Graduate Minor for master of science, master of arts, and doctor of philosophy degree programs is offered with specialization in hydrology, water quality, or water resources planning and management. The first two options are technically oriented, while the third gives added socioeconomic emphasis. Seminars, readings and conferences are offered by the Water Resources Graduate...
Most of the confusion with Australian postgraduate programmes occurs with the research-based programmes, particularly scientific programmes. Research degrees generally require candidates to have a minimum of a second-class four-year honours undergraduate degree to be considered for admission to a Ph.D. programme (M.Phil. are an uncommon route[24]). In science, a British first class honours (3 years) is not equivalent to an Australian first class honours (1 year research postgraduate programme that requires a completed undergraduate (pass) degree with a high grade-point average).[25] In scientific research, it is commonly accepted that an Australian postgraduate honours is equivalent to a British master's degree (in research). There has been some debate over the acceptance of a three-year honours degree (as in the case of graduates from British universities) as the equivalent entry requirement to graduate research programmes (M.Phil., Ph.D.) in Australian universities.[26] The letters of Honours programmes also added to the confusion. For example: B.Sc. (Hons) are the letters gained for postgraduate research honours at the University of Queensland. B.Sc. (Hons) does not indicate that this honours are postgraduate qualification. The difficulty also arises between different universities in Australia—some universities have followed the UK system.
In the UK and countries whose education systems were founded on the British model, such as the US, the master's degree was for a long time the only postgraduate degree normally awarded, while in most European countries apart from the UK, the master's degree almost disappeared[citation needed]. In the second half of the 19th century, however, US universities began to follow the European model by awarding doctorates, and this practice spread to the UK. Conversely, most European universities now offer master's degrees parallelling or replacing their regular system, so as to offer their students better chances to compete in an international market dominated by the American model.[13]
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